The Call, Column 93 – It’s Time to Energize Rhode Island!

1 04 2018

(April 1, 2018)

The Urban Farmer

It’s Time to Energize Rhode Island!

I just wanted to give you all a quick update on some exciting stuff happening in our small but forward-thinking state.

This past Wednesday, I testified in front of the Rhode Island Senate Committee on Environment and Agriculture, along with dozens of others, in favor of the Energize Rhode Island bill.

This bill would form a basic carbon dioxide pricing structure in Rhode Island. That means that for any fossil fuel product sold in Rhode Island, a tax would be levied on the company selling it, based on the carbon dioxide that it would output when burned – this includes gas, heating oil, natural gas, and coal- and natural-gas-derived electricity. The revenue collected from this tax will then be split up, with some of it being reinvested in renewable energy and sustainable infrastructure in our state, and the rest being returned directly to Rhode Island consumers and businesses as a rebate, to counteract the small increase in fossil fuel costs that will result from the tax. I will explain more about the awesome effects of this legislation below, but feel free to go to https://www.energizeri.org/about-the-bill.html for more information about the bill.

This experience of testifying at the State House was exceptionally gratifying for me. For one, the Senate Committee on Environment and Agriculture really, really knows their stuff. I can’t say that enough. They all demonstrated an extensive knowledge on climate change and other environmental issues, and were very vocal in their concerns for the future of our environment, state, and people. Unlike many politicians, they have worked together, both with each other and with the organizations and businesses that have a stake in this legislation, to craft the best CO2 pricing structure they can.

Also, I actually feel pretty confident that this bill may pass this year…after four years of growing in popularity but ultimately not becoming state law. This committee seems very ready to pass the bill, after which it will go to the House and Senate Finance Committees, then the general assembly. There is so much citizen and business support, it seems entirely within the realm of possibility that it will become law in 2018.

But all in all, I think the most gratifying thing was the fact that all of us in the room (short of a few corporate lobbyists who probably didn’t actually personally care) were on the same page, talking on the same level. When I sat at the committee’s table to give my testimony (yes, they actually encouraged us to do that), it felt like I was engaging in this big, 50-person discussion about the future of our planet and state and people. They were actually listening to us – they were actually listening to me, and I to them – and sharing in our concern for the health of the global environment. That was really powerful, and I was very impressed at the Senators that gave me (and probably most others in that room) that feeling…of actually caring.

So now, I want to try to motivate why this law is so important. Like I did for the committee, I will come at this primarily from my perspective as an engineer. This type of legislation is the best way to reduce carbon emissions, while catalyzing the shift towards renewable energies and sustainable infrastructure, and still providing for the wellbeing of taxpayers and small businesses.

Companies – and specifically fossil-fuel companies – make decisions based on the bottom line. But as it stands, they are allowed to abuse our common resource – the global atmosphere – for free. This is called a “negative externality” to their business model, an expense of doing business that, without government protections, they do not have to account for in their financial balance sheets.

Legislation like the Energize RI Act takes the necessary step of internalizing this negative externality, preventing societal freeloading, and removing the unfair advantage being given to producers of polluting, fossil fuel energies but not to those of clean, renewable ones…it simply ensures that environmental harm can’t be caused for free!

And what’s more, this bill will create additional market potential for renewable energy technologies, allowing businesses more freedom to invest early in the energy sources that will power our future. The implementation of this law will drive a huge, necessary shift towards renewable energy by simply allowing businesses to feel the true economic benefits and drawbacks of the energy sources that they decide to sell or use in producing electricity.

So in that way, this legislation is actually very good for small businesses in the State of Rhode Island. It creates a more level playing field, internalizing all costs and benefits associated with an energy-producers’ business decisions, and creates opportunities for energy-related projects that may not otherwise arise.

And of course, this legislation is good for the environment and the people. In (hopefully) passing this, the State Legislature will be helping to grow the renewable energy economy well before scarcity and environmental destruction force us to abandon fossil fuels and find alternatives. They are ushering in a future of plentiful, non-polluting energy sources that could conceivably power human society forever.

When this passes, we will be a national leader on this front. And I don’t know about you, but I am really energized by that thought!

My column appears every other Sunday in The Woonsocket Call (also in areas where The Pawtucket Times is available). The above article is the property of The Woonsocket Call and The Pawtucket Times, and is reprinted here with permission from these publications. These are excellent newspapers, covering important local news topics with voices out of our own communities, and skillfully addressing statewide and national news. Click these links to subscribe to The Woonsocket Call or to The Pawtucket Times. To subscribe to the online editions, click here for The Call and here for The Times. They can also be found on Twitter, @WoonsocketCall and @Pawtuckettimes.

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The Call, Column 92 – Some Updates on Environmental Happenings in Rhode Island

18 03 2018

(March 18, 2018)

The Urban Farmer

Some Updates on Environmental Happenings in Rhode Island

We live in exciting times, and an exciting place! Rhode Island is quickly becoming one of the national leaders in environmental action and legislation. This year, our State Legislature is considering a couple of really cool bills, all with the aim of preventing runaway climate change, and ushering in the era of renewable energies and sustainability. In the past few weeks, I have gone to a few events associated with this legislation (and more generally, environmental protection) and today, I wanted to give you a quick update on these happenings.

A few weeks ago, I went to a protest in Providence, organized by Save the Bay, Climate Action RI, and a few other local environmental groups, to oppose opening up Rhode Island’s coastline to offshore drilling. This was in response to a recent push by the federal government, to convince/force many of the coastal states to do this.

The risks from this move are obvious and pressing: oil spills and destruction of the fragile ecosystem of the coastline, absolutely. But even more pressing is the prospect of further, high-impact, binding investments in a dying fossil fuel infrastructure, making it that much more difficult to excise dirty fossil fuel energies and shift towards environmentally-neutral renewables.

The protest was magical! We began at the State House, where a press conference was being held by some of the pro-environmental state legislators, and marched down to the Providence Marriott, where the Federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) was holding an “informational session” intended to convince Rhode Island residents to support opening up our coastlines to the oil companies. After protesting street-side for some time, we went into the conference room at the Marriott, where BOEM was holding their indoctrination session (I mean, “informational session”).

In there, the 200 or so protesters formed (what I came to learn was a) human loudspeaker, wherein we took turns standing on a soapbox and giving short speeches, which were then echoed by everyone in the room. The purpose of this was to “take over” the conference room, and get our point across to the federal and state representatives that were there…and I think we did just that! I, being the super-extrovert that I am, of course took the opportunity to give an ad lib speech.

As a result of that protest, I joined Climate Action RI, the local branch of 350.org, whose basic goal is to end the use of fossil fuels, prevent climate change, and usher in the era of renewable energies and sustainable technologies. It’s an exciting group to be a part of, so if you’re interested in getting involved, their website is http://world.350.org/rhodeisland/.

Next up is the Carbon Pricing legislation in the State House. The action for this bill hasn’t really started yet, so I’ll just tell you about it quickly. Carbon Pricing, which we’ve discussed before in this column, is a basic tax on carbon-dioxide-emitting, fossil fuel products, levied on the distributors of these products and 1) reinvested in renewable energy infrastructure and 2) returned to the taxpayers as tax breaks. The intention of this legislation is to “internalize the externalities” – to actually create a financial incentive NOT to pollute the shared environment with fossil carbon dioxide, thereby financially incentivizing the move to climate-friendly energy sources.

The widespread adoption of this type of bill is absolutely imperative towards the goal of preventing runaway climate change. Rhode Island seems to be close to passing it, and it seems to have a lot of support in the state legislature. I have gotten involved with the group that is promoting this bill. If you want more information, or want to get involved, shoot me an email.

Finally, I want to tell you about a piece of legislation that I only a learned of a few days ago: the Global Warming Solutions Act. As it stands, Rhode Island has codified targets for the reduction in statewide greenhouse gas emissions, and the implementation of renewable energy technologies. But these targets are pretty vague, and there is no regulatory framework put in place to make sure they happen.

This bill would change that! A group of forward-thinking representatives are trying to pass a bill that creates concrete targets for GHG emissions over the next few decades, actual steps towards making those goals reality, and a regulatory framework that ensures their implementation.

This is HUGE! I spoke at a House subcommittee hearing the other day, in favor of the bill (naturally), and it seemed that the subcommittee is looking favorably on it. Like the Carbon Pricing bill (which is very complementary to this one), the work has only just begun towards the passage of this Global Warming Solutions Act. If you want to get involved, again, shoot me an email.

Climate change is happening, it’s our fault, and we need to fix it. That much is clear. But taking it further, as an engineer, I cannot overstate the importance of setting clear targets, formulating paths to meet those targets, and putting in place regulatory mechanisms to make sure we act appropriately…if we actually want to get anything done. Climate change is the most pressing existential threat that we face as a species and a global community, so I am deeply heartened to see this type of action being taken in our state. Stay tuned!

My column appears every other Sunday in The Woonsocket Call (also in areas where The Pawtucket Times is available). The above article is the property of The Woonsocket Call and The Pawtucket Times, and is reprinted here with permission from these publications. These are excellent newspapers, covering important local news topics with voices out of our own communities, and skillfully addressing statewide and national news. Click these links to subscribe to The Woonsocket Call or to The Pawtucket Times. To subscribe to the online editions, click here for The Call and here for The Times. They can also be found on Twitter, @WoonsocketCall and @Pawtuckettimes.